Covering Brick Walls With Vines: What Type Of Vine For A Brick Wall


By: Bonnie L. Grant, Certified Urban Agriculturist

Glorious Boston ivy blazing in the winter or flamboyant honeysuckle clambering over a wall are sights to see. If you have a brick wall and are in search of a climbing vine to decorate and enhance your home, you not only need to decide the type of vine for a brick wall but consider the health of your house and what method the vine uses to climb. The effect you are trying to achieve is another factor when choosing vines for brick walls. The best vines for brick walls will also depend upon how much work you want to put into the plant.

What Type of Vine for a Brick Wall?

The classic, elegant effect of ivy on the walls of a stately home is one that many of us wish to mimic. Covering brick walls with vines is also an excellent way to cover up any damage or repaired masonry that doesn’t match. Vigorously growing vines are a natural cover up and add Old World appeal to even a modest rancher.

Make a list of the attributes you are looking for in a wall covering before you purchase and install. Your vines will be with you for a long time and should convey the image you wish to project as well as have the ease of care for which most of us look.

Choosing vines for brick walls should come with a cautionary note. That ivy covered masonry of old was actually damaging. If you needed to remove it to inspect or repair the brick, pulling the ivy could actually damage the mortar. Ivy self-climbs and inserts its roots into any crack or crevasse.

Modern mortar is a bit stronger, but if your brick has any damage a self-climbing vine may not be right for you. Some vines are self-climbing and will have no trouble finding footholds on the surface and in chinks between brick and will do no damage. Still other vines are twining and will need support. No matter which type you choose, the next question is what you are hoping to achieve. Do you want evergreen winter interest, spring glory or summer fruit?

Best Vines for Brick Walls

Using climbing vines on brick walls can say something about your home and you. If you are practical and want fruiting vines, a grape or kiwi may be the plant for you. If you want old-fashioned elegance, English ivy or a climbing rose should fit the bill. And if you are covering brick walls with vines to disguise some imperfections, fast growing Virginia creeper or jasmine may be the plant for you. The best vines for brick walls may be a bit subjective, but here are some suggestions:

  • Boston Ivy – Self-climbing and turns fiery red in winter. Sticky adherent pads may be difficult to remove. Fast growing.
  • Hummingbird Vine – Needs a bit of help at first but eventually will climb by itself. Brilliant, huge blooms that are very attractive to hummingbirds and other pollinating insects.
  • Honeysuckle – Sweetly scented, vigorous vine, needs some support. Grows extremely fast. Draws pollinators and birds with its fruit. Deciduous.
  • Clematis – Not self-climbing. Astounding masses of colorful flowers. Many different clematis types. Deciduous or evergreen.
  • English Ivy – Self-climbing. Evergreen. Prefers a shady, moist location. Produces blue black fruits.
  • Virginia Creeper – Self-climbing, Native plant that has early fall color and bluish black pea sized fruits. Deciduous.
  • Wisteria – Wisteria is extremely fast growing, twining variety. Woody stems over time. Magnificent cascades of lavender or white blooms and delicate leaves.
  • Silver Fleece – Also known as silver lace, this one needs support. Silver, white tiny flowers turn blush pink when mature. Fast growing.
  • Balloon Vine – Sun lover that develops white flowers followed by heart-shaped, puffed green fruits. Needs support.

Using Climbing Vines on Brick Walls

Before you install any climbing plant, inspect your mortar and bricks first. Vines are fairly permanent and it would be a shame to have to remove them for repairs. If you have a vine that needs support, install that before planting. A trellis, lattice or wires are excellent ways to support non-self-climbing plants.

Consider how much upkeep you want to do. If you have lots of windows on the side that you plant the vine, you may have to prune consistently to keep them free.

Additionally, the speed of growth and potential invasiveness of the vine should be factors. Plants like wisteria can get out of hand without training and pruning. Others, like trumpet vine, may produce numerous babies every season and become a pest.

Using vines as part of the appearance of your home adds a unique signature to your landscape. There are many wonderful plants from which to choose, but choose wisely as this feature of the home is likely to be around a long time.

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Read more about Ornamental Vines General Care


Cover Up Unsightly Backyard Walls with Vines, Decor, and More

If your garden is backed by a boring or shabby wall, you can easily use the garden itself to cover it up. The wall can be made into an aesthetically pleasing feature instead of an eyesore with these few tips.

Accessorize the Wall

Pots and Plant Accessories

If you simply want to add some flare to a boring wall, consider adding some exciting accessories. Add a flat-sculpted frieze and hanging pots, sconces, lanterns, mirrors, or artwork. Pots with a flat side and hanging clip can be bought at many garden supply stores or ordered online. Inside, you can plant a multitude of flowering annuals and perennials, including vines that will eventually cascade down your wall. Strawberries make an excellent hanging plant and offer ruby-red berries as an extra treat.

Window Boxes and Frames

Horizontal window boxes can be affixed to the top of a wall and planted with flowers or veggies that compliment the garden bed below. Consider hanging picture frames along your wall and painting, or having your children paint, the spaces inside with fanciful artwork in complimentary colors. Or, make your own set of frames to coordinate with your other outdoor decor.

Lighting

Hanging lights, like strings of lanterns, are both pretty and useful. Also, sconces that hold candles (preferably electric candles for safety reasons) gives secluded ambiance. Candleholders that are easy-to-make include those made from wine bottles or mason jars.

All accessories should be properly fastened to the wall to withstand storms and snows, ideally by drilling bolts into the wall for all external pieces to be hung from.

Add Trellises and Vines

Trellises attached to the face of the wall will offer a pleasant appearance, especially on walls painted in natural colors. They also provide an excellent way to train vines or draping plants up or down the face of the wall. Anchor trellises in place securely, ideally by drilling eyebolts into the wall. Weak trellises may seem strong enough at first, but in a few years your vine will be much heavier and need extra support.

Tip: "When installing a trellis or lattice in front of your wall for garden vines, keep in mind the type of vine you want to grow. Different types of vines cling to surfaces in different ways. If the trellis chosen is not compatible, the vine will not be able to climb at all. For example, the garden clematis climbs by wrapping its short leaf stems around something. If the structure is thicker than 1/2 inch in diameter, it will be too wide for the clematis to cling to. So, using a thick wooden lattice would not support a clematis. Instead, use a series of wires strung horizontally over the fence or a thin wire trellis,” Rachel Klein, our expert gardening adviser, adds.

Flowering Vines

Beautiful flowering vines for wall coverage include climbing roses, garden clematis, trumpet vine, and honeysuckle. Vines that bear fruit are plentiful and include the perennial hops and grapes as well as plenty of annual vines including watermelon, cucumber, pumpkin, and zucchini. Wisteria makes a gorgeous perennial vine for maximum coverage but will need a huge amount of support as the vine becomes heavy in its maturity.

Tip: "Many gardeners with an unsightly brick wall to deal with are lured in by beautiful English ivy, which can climb almost any surface and cover it in a matter of months. However, beware of this invasive species. Although only comprised of woody vines, ivy grows quickly and is heavier than it looks. Ivy has been known to completely tear down walls and overhangs. More commonly, it simply opens up holes in the wall, which become a front door for ants and termites. If you plan to use ivy to span a wall, first install sturdy metal screening over the wall that is held in place securely with bolts into the wall and ground. The weight of the ivy will be transferred to this screen and will not be destructive to your home,” Klein cautions.


Best Vines For Brick Walls - Tips On Choosing Vines For Brick Walls - garden

Ivy self-climbs and inserts its roots into any crack or crevasse. Find more gardening information on Gardening Know How: Keep up to date with all that's happening in and around the garden. Once you have your design down measure out your points and mark on the wall with a pencil. No problem! I tried the nail in clips for brick. Smallgrove-Nurture is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. My Favorite Curtains, Heaters & Great Finds, Front Porch Cleaning, Including Ceiling, steps, DIY Your Own Website – Step by Step, Plant a Seed, All You Really Need To Know About Watering Potted Plants, Speed Dating Questions For You & Your Plants.

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One, drill holes, yes, I know, holes, into the MORTAR. >

common: < The most secure way to attach anything like a trellis to brick is with anchors installed in the brick. Hi ! From The Garden Forum: I can not get our ivy to stick to the brick wall! How about put up a string trellis for plants? Covering brick walls with vines is also an excellent way to cover up any damage or repaired masonry that doesn’t match. Some vines are self-climbing and will have no trouble finding footholds on the surface and in chinks between brick and will do no damage. I could not even see how these had been rated for brick. Apply clear silicone caulk made for selectedList: 'list selected', Fall is fast approaching and we’re 100% behind it. Use vines to provide privacy screening and aesthetic value. The wood slat wall offers great contrast against your brick wall. it was a surprise to me) and you will need the correct size. Also, the more weight, the more direct surface area needs to have contact. It has been planted 6 inches from the wall for 4 months and only one or two little guys actually … I was tired of yelling at my electronic screens about how they were wrong :). Vines add visual interest and versatility to home gardens. How to Make a Vining Plant Go Up a Wall. There are ways to hang up strands of lights without ever having to damage the bricks. > Glorious Boston ivy blazing in the winter or flamboyant honeysuckle clambering over a wall are sights to see. Step 2: Center the pattern on the wall. By Clicking below to submit this form, you acknowledge that the information you provided will be transferred to Sendinblue for processing in accordance with their It appeared to be such a thin area the clips were gripping too, and they can be easily knocked off if the pressure is coming from the side, or you pull away from the wall. I would love to hear about them please comment below Creativity will always find a way! For e.g [email protected]. Sign up for our newsletter. To test how long they worked and how effective they were, I grew plants that needed staking support on twine to be attached to the supports. link to Lodgepole Pine, A Wildfire Friendly Tree? If you have lots of windows on the side that you plant the vine, you may have to prune consistently to keep them free. I used the following brick clips to mount on the same wall, tied the mounting board to the clips, and installed the string trellis for the morning glories and moon vines to grow. BAYTECH 120Pcs Plant Climbing Wall Fixture Clips Green, Cable Tie Clips, Plant Climbing Fixer Self-Adhesive Fixture Plant Support Vines Holder Binding Clip Wall Sticky Hook 4.1 out of 5 stars 33 $10.79 If you have large flat pieces of stone, like stacked flagstone, or slate, that has a deep inset before you get back to the mortar, see if you can find ‘C’ clamps that will fit around the individual stones, and hang from that. Mortar can be filled easily, and then there would be no damage to the stone. Is there thick enough mortar between the stone pieces to drill and place hardware? The mortar between the bricks also needs to have enough of a squared-off lip to grip. My plan was for the vines to shade the south-facing wall, lowering the temperature gain on the building in the summer. Check out my most popular post .. Want to hang decorative items from a brick wall, but don’t want to drill a hole in it? Use regular picture mounting hardware on the board. What Type of Vine for a Brick Wall? I agree to receive your newsletters and accept the data privacy statement. As of 2 months later, the growth of the vines are thick and have exceeded the height of the mounting board with brick … Sign up to get all the latest gardening tips! The best vines for brick walls will also depend upon how much work you want to put into the plant. Like how a terracotta pot, if you wiped it with a clean white cloth, no matter how many times you wipe it, a little more terra cotta will be rubbed off on the cloth. If you are practical and want fruiting vines, a grape or kiwi may be the plant for you. I have to admit I haven’t considered this idea so far, but I’m in love with how beautiful it looks, so I’ll definitely give it a go. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Vines That Will Not Damage Brick Mortar. Come join me! I decided the only thing to do was start my own site! Bricks are bricks…right? 3 Hold the trellis up against the stucco wall until you achieve the desired position. Plants like wisteria can get out of hand without training and pruning. This one is a tough one, but here are three hacks you can use. While some of us may not be ready to see Halloween decorations in stores at the end of August, we’re clicking our heels for a change in seasons. Take advantage of a … Now your trellis is firmly attached to the wall and there is enough space for vines to wrap around the wood. In addition, fishing Mount a board or some other decorative element across the front of the stone area, mounting on brackets on either side of the stone area. Information is specific to particular climates. Do you have a regular wall on either side of the stone area? That ivy covered masonry of old was actually damaging. If you have a vine that needs support, install that before planting. It was easy to install, as long as you knew and purchased the right size for your brick. Consider how much upkeep you want to do. Bricks come in different dimensions (who knew? Be careful of vines growing on brick they can damage your brick and impact the fireplace. If you have a brick wall or fence, you can still make it festive for Christmas! These are easily filled when removed and the actual brick has not been damaged. Worked great there, but the brick? Modern mortar is a bit stronger, but if your brick has any damage a self-climbing vine may not be right for you. Provide your email address to subscribe. eval(ez_write_tag([[300,250],'besidethefrontdoor_com-box-4','ezslot_1',104,'0','0'])) The outdoor strength double-sided sticky tape held light objects, much lighter than labeled for a month. To test this, I mounted a 3-foot (1 meter) long lightweight strip horizontally on the brick wall, maximizing the surface area for the sticky to stick. How can you attach something to a brick wall without a drill? They also provide an anchor point to suspend Oasis cages or attach greenery. The lodgepole. With a Bachelors's degree in Plant & Soil Science, I love to help people understand the why's behind the 'rules' for plants so that they can apply to their own situation. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Not even close. This site is owned and operated by Smallgrove-Nurture headquartered in Idaho, USA.

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. Not a chance, they just bent or refused to budge at all.


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